Capacity Building

Capacity building within First Nations is an integral part of MAPS’ mandate. MAPS has developed TUS (Traditional Use) & TEK (Traditional Environmental Knowledge) research methodologies for Mi’kmaw organizations in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. It has supplied TUS/TEK interviewer training for Mi’kmaw organizations in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec. MAPS has also provided GIS (Geographic Information Systems) implementation and technician training for Mi’kmaq organizations in Nova Scotia, New Brunswick, Prince Edward Island, and Quebec.

MAPS also fosters among Mi’kmaw youths the interest in science and science-based habitat stewardship and improvement techniques through hands-on training workshops and practical involvement in stewardship initiatives.

 

Other Projects

Members of the MAPS team have been involved in land use and historical research for Aboriginal organizations and communities in Labrador and Northern Quebec. This has included several studies assessing community impacts of major resource developments.

Species at Risk

MAPS is working with Environment Canada, Fisheries & Oceans Canada, and Parks Canada infusing Aboriginal traditional knowledge (ATK) into Species at risk research and recovery strategies. Examples of this are the recent ATK studies relating to the American eel and Atlantic salmon (downloadable from the Resources section). MAPS is also involved in on-the-ground habitat rehabilitation initiatives.

Mi’kmaw Ecological Knowledge Study (MEKS): MAPS carries out Mi’kmaw Ecological Knowledge Studies as part of environmental impact statements/assessments of industrial, housing and infrastructure developments. E.g. proposed Black Point Quarry, Guysborough Co., NS”
For more details, click here., and also see our Resources section.

BlackPointQuarry_ProjectInformation.pdf  7.5MB

Petroglyphs

Cultural Resources Example: Petroglyphs

 

The Mi’kmaw petroglyphs Nova Scotia’s Kejimkujik and George lakes, one of Atlantic Canada’s most precious cultural resources, are slowly eroding. While the individual drawings and writings are well known, the spatial relation between the pictographs had not been documented. In 2008, the MAPS team undertook to digitize tracings of the petroglyphs and establishing the spatial arrangement within groups of drawings.
This will facilitate future research towards a contextual interpretation of the pictographs

Petroglyph2 Petroglyph1